Alan Davie 1920-2014

We were very sad to hear the news about the death of Edinburgh College of Art (ECA) alumnus and fellow, Alan Davie. The close connection between Davie and ECA over the decades can be seen throughout our collections and so we’ve compiled a selection of images to celebrate his work and life.

From the presentation speech when Davie was awarded his Honorary Fellowship of ECA at Dovecot Studios in 2004:

Alan Davie’s art is inspired by his insatiable curiosity concerning a whole range of different aspects of our world – from ancient and non-western cultures to modern philosophical and psychological ideas on the nature of human life and society. Furthermore, within his own spheres of creativity he has shown himself to be a truly multi-faceted practitioner by excelling, not only in his art, but also in his poetry, his highly-admired musical composition and performance, as well as in his own illuminating and impassioned writings on what it means to be an artist. We must remember, however, that for Alan these creative achievements are just part of a whole kaleidoscope of other various activities - such as flying, sailing, scuba-diving and gardening which have also been an essential part of Alan’s joy in life. Few would challenge the resounding statement which Alan made at the end of a talk he gave at the University of Edinburgh in 1992:

I am totally involved in the state of TRUE LIVING

I AM LIFE’

Alan Davie, Kaleidoscope for a Parrot (1966). Oil on canvas. Donated by the artist in 1998. University of Edinburgh Art Collection

Alan Davie’s ECA Student Record. Edinburgh College of Art Archive.

Letter from ECA Principal, Hubert Wellington, to Davie when he was on active service in the Second World War. Edinburgh College of Art Archive.

Sharing Our Experiences: Visit from Dutch Information Professionals

Colleagues from across Library and University Collections and User Services Divisions entertained Dutch Information Professionals from KNVI on Monday providing a view from across collections and services about what do. Five minutes ago the reflection on what they have learned was that we react to student needs and there is less red tape in Scotland!

Rachel, Laura, Dominic, Liz and Kerry are at The National Library of Scotland enjoying the presentations from our Dutch colleagues about their thoughts and perspectives from Holland. A selfie from Rachel, Dominic and Laura just for fun on a Friday!

Thank you to our colleagues from Holland! It’s been great to meet you!

Sharing Our Experiences: Visit from Dutch Information Professionals

Colleagues from across Library and University Collections and User Services Divisions entertained Dutch Information Professionals from KNVI on Monday providing a view from across collections and services about what do. Five minutes ago the reflection on what they have learned was that we react to student needs and there is less red tape in Scotland!

Rachel, Laura, Dominic, Liz and Kerry are at The National Library of Scotland enjoying the presentations from our Dutch colleagues about their thoughts and perspectives from Holland. A selfie from Rachel, Dominic and Laura just for fun on a Friday!

Thank you to our colleagues from Holland! It’s been great to meet you!

Boris Bućan - Printmaker

Our post today comes from Natasha Russell, Graduate Studio Assistant in Printmaking at ECA. Recently we spent a couple of hours piecing together and marveling at a stack of 18 or so large scale oil based screen prints by the Artist Boris Bucan. These have recently been taken in by the Art Collection, gathered from the plan chests in the Print Workshop of Edinburgh College of Art where they had sat for almost three decades.

Viewing these prints was no easy feat as the prints measure two by two metres squared and are each made up of six pieces of thin cartridge-like paper. Spreading them out on the carpet between shifted tables we ordered and puzzled together the prints to form vibrant and masterfully composed posters.

The pieces here range from posters for Operas to Theatrical productions to National days. One of the posters is even for his own exhibition that exhibited these prints when they were last shown in Edinburgh, detailing, ‘Posters for Croatian National Theatre…Edinburgh College of Art…27 April 1984’. This solved the mystery of where they came from and how long they had been hiding in the plan chests.

While there are distinct motifs carrying between some of the prints, for example the geometric grass patterns, the posters vary widely in style. They span from scribbly crayon drawn monochrome prints for Puccini’s La Boheme to the bold colours of the checker-boarded ‘Faust’ that plays with a simple shape to create an optical illusion like scene.  In this way his prints prove a great example of the diversity of this printmaking technique.

Bucan was born in Zagreb in 1947, where he continued to study and produce work as a graphic artist. Indeed most of these prints are printed with a mark of Zagreb Academy of Fine Arts.  He is still working and exhibiting internationally.

 

 

 

What’s Your Dancing Style?

We thought we share some of the collection we got out for Sport and Recreation Management students today. These pages are from three mid 20th century student notebooks on how to teach different forms of dance.  Greek Dancing, Aesthetic Dancing and English Folk Dancing.

We enjoyed the descriptions of the character of dancing styles - National, Fantastic, Grotesque and Aerobatic!

Enjoy The View! Edinburgh At Its Best!

Everyone has to be just a little be jealous of our teabreak view today! Edinburgh at its best! #glorious #CRCEDinburgh

Pop Up Exhibition: Edinburgh College of Art and The Eagle Press

On the 6th floor of the University of Edinburgh Main Library is a Pop Up Exhibition of items from the Edinburgh College of Art Archives. We wanted to share some of the recent finds from the typography department and ‘The Eagle Press’ that was run by the College.

Do come and have a look. If you have memories about the department or The Eagle Press, get in touch and email Rachel.Hosker@ed.ac.uk!

So, it’s Innovative Learning Week here at the University of Edinburgh. There’s a packed programme of events, including Library Pecha Kucha, Mathematical Jewellery workshops at ECA, and behind the scenes tours.

You can even join in from home (and win prizes) by taking part in the Centre for Research Collections online quiz - just follow them on Facebook and answer the questions they post twice a day. Submit your answers via the form found here.

Have fun!

So, it’s Innovative Learning Week here at the University of Edinburgh. There’s a packed programme of events, including Library Pecha Kucha, Mathematical Jewellery workshops at ECA, and behind the scenes tours.

You can even join in from home (and win prizes) by taking part in the Centre for Research Collections online quiz - just follow them on Facebook and answer the questions they post twice a day. Submit your answers via the form found here.

Have fun!

Dusting for prints…

We all like to pretend that no-one touches the things in museums. Fact is, like it or not, people do. We have been working with ECA Postgraduate student Morgan Kinne for a little over a year to find a way for her to fingerprint parts of the ECA Cast Collection. We eventually found a solution that in no way harmed the casts and Morgan began dusting earlier this month. I’m delighted to say that this worked extremely well, as these images show. Morgan says of the project:

"I recently carried out a project in the sculpture court that involved myself dusting three of ECA’s plaster casts - Spinario, Dying Gaul and Castor and Pollux - for fingerprints. The prints reveal a part of the statues’ history that has gone unnoticed and stand as a record of the interactions between people and these statues and reveal a relationship between the art students and the art historical objects."

The Cast Collection at ECA was originally used for the purposes of formal drawing instruction at the College. While this is not the case today, projects like Morgan’s, and also Krijn de Koning’s Landutilise the collection in exactly the same way - to support teaching and provide inspiration.

Fashion Friday and #museumselfie!

From 2003, the work of Edinburgh College of Art Fashion Student Veronica Renton.

A theme of black bead jewellery continued (just about seen) in our #MuseumSelfie from Wednesday!

https://twitter.com/UoEArtArchives/status/426038948503097345/photo/1

archivesofamericanart:

todaysdocument:

NEW YORK, NY - Sky-line for the masque ball! - Beaux Arts fete features novel architectural costumes.

Excerpted from: This Week in Universal News: Beaux-Arts Ball, 1931, Universal News Volume 3, Release 7 #1-10, January 19, 1931

On January 23, 1931, architects dressed up as the buildings they designed for the Beaux-Arts Ball in New York.  In this week’s featured story, they are pictured  from left to right, A. Stewart Walker as the Fuller Building, Leonard Schultze as the Waldorf-Astoria, Ely Jacques Kahn as the Squibb Building, William Van Alen as the Chrysler Building, Ralph Walker as the Wall Street Building and Joseph Freedlander as the Museum of the City of New York.

Watch the entire newsreel, featuring a polar submarine, a train wreck, Charles Lindbergh receiving a medal from a French ambassador, dancing dogs, and “dangerous” figure skating, among other stories here.

Universal Newsreels were shown in movie theaters twice a week, from 1929 until 1967, and covered a wide range of American life and history during that time period. In 1974, Universal deeded its collection to the United States through the National Archives and is one of our most used motion picture collections. Learn more about the Universal Newsreel Collection in this post and in this Prologue article. Watch other Universal Newsreels in our research room, in OPA, and on this playlist.

via Media Matters » This Week in Universal News: Beaux-Arts Ball, 1931

Too good not to reblog. Can you imagine Frank Gehry dressed up as the Bilbao Guggenheim or I. M. Pei as the East Wing of the National Gallery?

These reminded us of the Revel costumes and sets at Edinburgh College of Art over the years!!  Love it!